Replacement officials taking heat
ESPN.com news services
September 18, 2012
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One official was pulled from duty because he's a fan. Another negated a touchdown without ever throwing a penalty flag. Several others had difficulty with basic rules.
Upon further review, the NFL's replacement officials came up short in Week 2.

Coaches and players around the league are losing patience and speaking out against the fill-in officials following a slew of questionable calls in the games Sunday and Monday night.
Some players are even joking about dipping into their own pockets to settle the contract dispute and get the regular officials back on the field.
"I don't know what they're arguing about, but I got a couple of (million) on it, so let's try to make it work," Washington defensive back DeAngelo Hall said, kiddingly, on Monday. "I'm sure the locker room could put up some cash and try to help the cause out."
The NFL locked out the regular officials in June after their contract expired. Negotiations with the NFL Referees Association broke down several times during the summer, including just before the season, and the league is using replacements for the first time since 2001.
The results have been mixed.
Just hours before kickoff Sunday, the NFL removed side judge Brian Stropolo from the New Orleans-Carolina game because it was discovered he's a Saints fan.
Stropolo will not be allowed to return as an official until the league completes a review of the circumstances that dictated the action. He had displayed his unabashed passion as a longtime Saints fan on his Facebook page, which has since been disabled. He also posted Sunday's game assignment, a specific violation of league policy for its officials.
"We are reviewing Mr. Stropolo's status and pending completion of that review, he will not be serving as an on-field game official," said Greg Aiello, the league's senior vice president of communications.
Then came the on-field problems.
In Philadelphia's 24-23 win over Baltimore, two game-altering calls left quarterback Joe Flacco and linebacker Ray Lewis fuming, though it appeared on replay that both calls were accurate. That didn't make them any less controversial.

Flacco's scoring pass to receiver Jacoby Jones in the fourth quarter was called back because of offensive pass interference. The official who made the call didn't throw the yellow flag, though he immediately signaled a penalty.
"I might sound like a little bit of a baby here," Flacco said, "but for them to make that call, I think, was a little crazy."
There was confusion later during Philadelphia's go-ahead drive. First, the two-minute warning occurred twice. Then, quarterback Michael Vick's forward pass was called a fumble inside the Ravens 5. It was ruled incomplete following a replay, and Vick scored on the next play after a few anxious moments.
"It's extra stress when you have to sit there and wait," Vick said. "The one thing you don't want to do, you don't want to put the game in the officials' hands."
Eagles running back LeSean McCoy said in an interview with SportsRadio 94 WIP in Philadelphia that a ref told him that he needed him for his fantasy football team.
"I'll be honest, they're like fans," McCoy said of the replacement referees. "One of the refs was talking about his fantasy team, like 'McCoy, come on, I need you for my fantasy,' ahhh, what?!"
It's unknown if McCoy was serious. ESPN has reached out to the running back for clarification on whether the exchange actually happened.
Aiello told ProFootballTalk.com in an email that NFL officials are not permitted to play fantasy football. ESPN also has reached out to the NFL for comment on McCoy's remarks.
Lewis, like many players around the league, has seen enough.
"The time is now," he said. "How much longer are we going to keep going through this whole process? I don't have the answer. I just know across the league teams and the league are being affected by it. It's not just this game, it's all across the league. And so if they want the league to have the same reputation it's always had, they'll address the problem. Get the regular referees in here and let the games play themselves out.
"We already have controversy enough with the regular refs calling the plays."
The problems continued Monday night when Peyton Manning led the Denver Broncos against the Atlanta Falcons.
The officials missed a call on Denver's first touchdown, ruling that Demaryius Thomas was pushed out of bounds. The replay clearly showed he got both feet down, and the call was reversed after a review.

The Falcons' first score also was reversed, this time with the officials ruling, with help from a replay, that Michael Turner actually landed short of the goal line. He wound up scoring on the next play.
In the second half, the officials got mixed up on where to place the ball after a defensive holding penalty on Champ Bailey. The crowd booed while the officials conferred, finally moving it a few yards forward to the proper spot.
It was those sorts of delays that helped the game drag on for nearly 3.5 hours.
Despite the public outcry, the league backed the replacement crews, a collection of small-college officials who have been studying NFL rules since the summer.
"Officiating is never perfect. The current officials have made great strides and are performing admirably under unprecedented scrutiny and great pressure," Aiello said in an email to The Associated Press. "As we do every season, we will work to improve officiating and are confident that the game officials will show continued improvement."
Reached for comment Tuesday, Aiello told ESPN in an email "that we are looking at how to improve officiating for the long term, and that is an important part of the negotiations with the NFLRA."
While some of the mistakes on Sunday were judgment calls -- such as a pass interference penalty on Pittsburgh defensive back Ike Taylor in which he appeared to miss a New York Jets receiver -- the more egregious errors appear to be misinterpretations of rules.
In St. Louis' 31-28 victory over Washington, Rams coach Jeff Fisher challenged a second-quarter fumble by running back Steven Jackson near the goal line and it was overturned. The Rams ended up kicking a field goal, which was the margin of victory.
The problem there was that a coach is not allowed to challenge a play when a turnover is ruled on the field. It should have been an automatic 15-yard penalty on Fisher. Also, if Fisher threw the red challenge flag before the replay official initiated the review, then a review is not allowed and the Redskins would have kept the ball.

"I just think that they're just so inconsistent that it definitely has an effect on the games," Redskins linebacker London Fletcher said. "You were hoping it would get better, but everybody is having to deal with it."
In the Cleveland-Cincinnati game, the clock continued to run after an...
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